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Should there be a Maximum Workplace Temperature?

Related content: Should there be a Maximum Workplace Temperature?

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212.
anonymous
Member - 0 posts
28 Nov 2011 10:47AM

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211.
m walton
Member - 0 posts
10 Jun 2008 7:57PM

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210.
Anonymous
27 Sep 2007 11:10AM

As a serving british soldier I feel able to comment on this issue due to the very nature of my job. First and foremost i am a soldier and have worked and lived in the extremes of temprature most of my working life. From the Artic to Iraq. most of this has been done without the luxury or air con or central heating. I survived! Secondly i am a heating and refrigeration engineer. ironic ???
23 degC is not hot. Nor is it cold; it is well within comfort conditions provided the relitive humidity is between 50%-60%. And theres the rub. temprature itself cannot be taken as a measure of comfort. The factors to consider are wet bulb and dry bulb tempratures. The closer they are together the less comfortable you are going to be.Also you should all remember there is an enviromental cost to all this...... Perhaps we should consider putting up with a few days of warm weather each year and do a little something to save the planet. Just an idea!


209.
Craig Rowland
Member - 3 posts
16 Aug 2007 10:15AM

It's interesting no-one seems to consider the environmental effects of a mass increase in air conditioning installations?


208.
terry winnan
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16 Jul 2007 5:54PM

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207.
terry winnan
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16 Jul 2007 5:37PM

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206.
terry winnan
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16 Jul 2007 5:37PM

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205.
terry winnan
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16 Jul 2007 5:37PM

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204.
Anonymous
8 Aug 2006 1:09AM

It appears that my previous commentary on this website has been overtaken once I mentioned Unison.

My last comment was 'is an anomoly between people's knowledge of Farenheit and Celsius.


203.
Colin Holmes
Member - 1 post
3 Aug 2006 9:17AM

While I fully agree that there should be a upper temperature limit that people can work in I don't see how it would be enforcible. There has been a lot of talk about the minimum temperature in which people can work, I have worked in the distribution industry for the last 30 years and have never worked in a heated warehouse. Every year people work in temperatures well below the so called legal minimum, when I have questioned EHO's the answer is always the same " Its not reasonibly practiable to heat a large warehouse". So would I get the same reply when I ask about the warehouse being to hot.


202.
Anonymous
29 Jul 2006 12:01PM

As a Unison H&S rep I seem to be fighting a losing battle with the council over their brand new "state of the art" library which regularly sees temps of 110 and over. staff are droping like flies but with a restrictive sick policy staff are afraid to go off sick for fear of dismissal. In this day and age a glass building with no air-con!!!


201.
Anonymous
27 Jul 2006 10:43AM

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200.
Sheila Keogh
Member - 2 posts
27 Jul 2006 9:37AM

Not all companies can afford air conditioning. The charity org that I work for certainly cannot afford to lash out money on air con for all of its very small offices that are dotted around the country. If we spend money on air con, we'll have no money left to spend on the people that we are here to assist.

Sheila


199.
Anonymous
26 Jul 2006 3:31PM

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198.
fiona paterson
Member - 1 post
26 Jul 2006 2:23PM

I work for a local council as a Social Care Officer. This involves carrying out personal care on older adults, in thier own homes. The temperature in sunny Scotland is increasing steadily but what does not help is that the elderly often have thier heating on. Imagine assisting with a shower in 30 degrees with a radiator constantly pumping heat at you! To make matters worse these duties are carried out in a totally unsuitable uniform of full length navy trousers and a maroon polo shirt made of the thickest material possibly made! The arguement is not to withdraw our services but simply to be allowed to wear cooler clothing. Easily solved you would think? NO, because the decision is made by individuals higher up the council who are sitting in thier offices with little summer dresses on!


197.
Anonymous
26 Jul 2006 7:47AM

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196.
Gillian Nightingale
Member - 131 posts
23 Jul 2006 7:36PM

Employees can now download, and print out, a Workplace Law factsheet to give to their employers. This factsheet contains advice and guidance on how employers can - and should - deal with high workplace temperatures. The factsheet can be downloaded from: https://www.workplacelaw.net/my/download.php?download_id=423


195.
Raymond Hutt
Member - 0 posts
22 Jul 2006 7:33PM

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194.
Steven Smith
Member - 1 post
22 Jul 2006 6:09PM

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193.
Anonymous
21 Jul 2006 2:51PM

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192.
Andrew Sutton
Member - 5 posts
21 Jul 2006 8:51AM

We've been looking at how to control the heat our employees are exposed to. A number are working outside with no shade for 8 hours and are becoming tired and dehydrated quickly.
We have implemented the following:
- Readily available cold drinks to prevent dehydration
- Regular breaks
- Sun tan lotion available if employees want it - most do!
- We have also found some "cooling wraps" via google that can be put inside safety helmets to reduce the heat.

Anybody got any further suggestions?


191.
tom nelson
Member - 1 post
20 Jul 2006 6:00AM

Working at an GM automotive dealership as a tech. The past couple of days have seen temps out doors at 100 degrees Fahrenheit and inside the building which is easily 65 years old the air temp was 110 degrees Fahrenheit. Today it was heavenly cool 92 degrees Fahrenheit in the work place. One of the office personnel came out and asked how I could work in such conditions. You see inside the office the AC is so high that people are wearing sweat jackets. Do we need a temp limit? Absolutely the people in the office should not have to endure winter in the middle of summer.

Tech@ jamaica Buick NY


190.
Anonymous
19 Jul 2006 9:59PM

37 degrees outside and 40+ on the shop floor today. One small fan on the cash desk and any liquids on the shop floor must be hidden from customers. WTF? This sounds a bit crazy but please stay away from my store so that the ambient temp stays slightly lower.


189.
Anonymous
19 Jul 2006 7:05PM

I work for a plastics manufacturer, operating extrusion machines which run at 200-300 degrees centigrade. There are 11 such machines in the factory and the taskmasters expect you to run these machines at 1250Kg per hour. Imagine having to bag that into 25Kg bags. Thats 1 a minute. In temperatures like todays (19/07/06) in the UK it is too much. We have no air con, a dodgy extraction system (for fumes etc) and general ventilation is poor. A legal limit needs to be set for those of us that work in such conditions. Someone will keel over one day...


188.
Anonymous
19 Jul 2006 6:46PM

im a tig welder in a factory without any air con it was 37c in my bay today, we have been given free cold drinks and a fan that blows the hot air straight back at you nice. There should be an upper limit as people collasping and banging their heads on stillages on the way down must be a health and safey issue.


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